31.1.06

quotes...

Sacredness is making a comeback, here, there, and everywhere. In a muddled way, we are hoping for the return of the traditional aura; and we don't have enough words to shout down contemporary individualism. A phase in the modern project is being wound up. Today, after two centuries of stuggle for singularity and against group impulses, we must bring in a new synthesis which, alone, will be able to save us from the regressive fantasy that is abroad. Reintroducing the idea of plurality, for contemporary culture hailing from modernity, means inventing ways of being together, forms of interaction that go beyond the inevitablility of the families, ghettos of technological user-friendliness, and collective institutions on offer. We can only extend modernity to advantage by going beyond the struggles it has bequeathed us. In our post-industrial societies, the most pressing thing is no longer the emancipation of individuals, but the freeing-up of inter-human communications, the dimensional emancipation of existence.
- Nicolas Bourriaud, Relational Aesthetics, 1998

3 comments:

Freddy T. Wyatt said...

How would we define: contemporary individualism? And, what would be some specific manifestations of it? Where do we see it expressed? Also, where would Bourriaud say we see the "sacredness comeback". I have my ideas but I was wondering if he gives commentary on where he sees it.

TBW said...

Bourriaud is commenting on developments in the art world of the last decade or so. During the modern era of art, the driving force for artists was originality. Just think of Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, or Jackson Pollock; more than groundbreaking painters, these guys were larger than life personalities, modern icons. We may look at modern art and say: "Anyone can do that!" But the art world answers: "Yeah, but they did it first!" I will soon post a reflection on his book that will have a good deal of summary.

Freddy T. Wyatt said...

hey...i can't comment on your newest post. there is no link to comment.
ftw